New Gallery Section | Photoshoots

August 20, 2017

I have created a new category in the gallery called Photoshoots and added over 30 shoots of Sterling. Go and enjoy these beautiful portraits.

Thank you to Jess for donating two of the shoots!


Gallery Links:
Sterling K. Brown Fan > PROFESSIONAL > PHOTOSHOOTS

Sterling K. Brown Dishes on What to Expect from the This Is Us Season 2 Premiere

August 16, 2017

Sterling K. Brown wants to promise fans that the season 2 premiere of This Is Us will not disappoint.

“It’s a full episode,” Brown, 41, tells PEOPLE’s Editor-in-Chief Jess Cagle in the latest episode of The Jess Cagle Interview (streaming now on the People/Entertainment Weekly Network) of the Sept. 26 return of his hit NBC drama.

Brown — who won an Emmy for his portrayal of prosecutor Chris Darden in The People vs. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story last year and is currently nominated for his work on This Is Us — says his character Randall will begin the show’s sophomore season pushing his wife Beth (Susan Kelechi Watson) to adopt a child like Randall was adopted.

“He wants to sort of fulfill the legacy of his parents Jack and Rebecca, honor William’s [Randall’s birth father (Ron Cephas Jones)] memory, by adopting,” says Brown. “Beth doesn’t quite see it exactly the same way as Randall does, so they’re having a conversation, if you will, around this whole adoption issue.”

Unsure of how to proceed, Randall goes to seek the counsel of his mother (Mandy Moore).

“She tells him that it wasn’t automatic for her. When she first saw me as a baby she had to be convinced by Jack (Milo Ventimiglia), and Jack was just insistent, and he pushed, and sometimes there has to be that person in the marriage who pushes, who sort of guides the other person in the direction that they need to be,” says Brown. “She talks about how this stranger became her child, this child became her life, and that’s … Randall.”

“The adoption storyline is big and the way that we go about it transforms from Randall’s original perception of how he thinks it should be,” Brown continues. “So Beth and Randall come up with a compromise together for what works for them as a couple, similar to how Rebecca and Jack did — but it looks a little bit different.”

And Brown adds that his costars Chrissy Metz, who stars as Randall’s sister Kate, and Justin Hartley, who stars as Randall’s brother Kevin, are also in stages of big transition in season 2.

“The storylines are great because you have Kevin and his newfound career, or like resurgence of his film career, simultaneously trying to balance that with his relationship with Sophie,” says Brown, who is married to his Stanford University sweetheart, Ryan Michelle Bathe, and their sons. “Trying to find balance as an actor right now I can say is one of the most challenging things about ‘success’ because you want to be able to give everyone the time that they deserve, professionally and personally. And so, I got two kids at home, 6 and 2. I got a wife of 11 years who’s also in this business as well, so I empathize with Kevin on the journey that he takes throughout season 2.”

Brown says Kate’s burgeoning singing career is actually going to create a bit of conflict between the mother and daughter on the show.

“It’s something that she and her mother sort of shared with one another … and it’s interesting too because the relationship between mothers and daughters, like mothers and sons is like, we’re simpatico. But mothers and daughters can often have a sort of friction-full relationship, so we’ll see how this singing sort of brings up that tension between the two of them.”

But Brown says the tension is worth it for fans to get to hear Metz sing.

“She’s got a beautiful voice,” he says. “Chrissy Metz can sang.”

Watch Sterling K. Brown’s full episode of The Jess Cagle Interview before season 2 of This Is Us premieres Sept. 26 on NBC.

(Source)

Listen to stars read An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power audiobook excerpts

July 31, 2017

“In some ways, it’s easy to understand one of the main reasons it’s taken so much time to fully recognize the self-destructive nature of our current pattern,” writes former vice president and Nobel Peace Prize recipient Al Gore in An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power, the follow-up to his 2006 global warming documentary An Inconvenient Truth. “Nevertheless, the obvious and overwhelming evidence of the damage we are causing is now increasingly impossible for reasonable people to ignore.”

The Best Documentary Oscar winner, directed by Davis Guggenheim, was based on Gore’s lectures and global call to action. Like its predecessor, An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power does some of the same, but this time the environmentalist exposes how humankind has caused the destruction of Earth in the form of a documentary and a book, which follows Gore around the world as he ties Zika, flooding, and other natural disasters to climate change.

Gore can be heard in one of three exclusive clips, below, from the audiobook that you’ll hear exclusively on EW; two others feature Shailene Woodley (Big Little Lies) and Sterling K. Brown (This is Us).

In addition to stories about how science affects health — air pollution contributes to developmental problems while natural disasters contribute to spiking rates of PTSD, depression, and anxiety in children, he contends — the book also touches upon the Truth Campaign, which began in 1998 as a means to decrease tobacco use amongst teens by exposing the manipulation of that demographic by tobacco company advertisements. The fossil fuel industry, it was later revealed, used those tactics to manipulate and mislead the public about the factual causes of climate change. Gore begs the public to ask the question, “Am I being played for a fool and taken advantage of by these giant corporations?”

An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power hits theaters on July 28th.

Listen to the clip here.

Sterling Earns An Emmy Award Nomination

July 13, 2017

Congratulations Sterling on your Emmy Award Nomination! It is well deserved and we are so proud of you! Be sure to tune in to watch the Emmys on September 17th.

Best Actor in a Drama Series
Sterling K. Brown (This Is Us)
Anthony Hopkins (Westworld)
Bob Odenkirk (Better Call Saul)
Matthew Rhys (The Americans)
Liev Schreiber (Ray Donovan)
Milo Ventimiglia (This Is Us)

Also a huge congratulations to Sterling’s co-star Milo for his nomination too!

The Hollywood Reporter Drama Actor Roundtable

June 26, 2017

Sterling participated in the Hollywood Reporters Emmy Drama Actor Roundtable at the end of May and I thought you might enjoy reading excerpts from the discussion!

Six stars at the top of their game — including Billy Bob Thornton, Sterling K. Brown, John Lithgow and Jeffrey Wright — open up about appreciating early struggles (“You forget what it feels like to dream”), the indignity of typecasting (“Terrorist No. 3 — I’d rather be broke”) and the pros and cons of being one of only a few who know where your character is going.

Ewan McGregor has been a movie star for 20 years, but he’s still petrified every time he takes on a new role. “My wife will tell you — there’s a two-week period of, ‘I’m not going to be able to do it,’ ” he says. Fifty-year veteran John Lithgow is in the same boat — just two days earlier, he admits, he suffered a bout of stage terror. The fear seems to resonate with the four other stars — Sterling K. Brown, 41; Riz Ahmed, 34; Jeffrey Wright, 51; and Billy Bob Thornton, 61 — who’ve gathered with Lithgow, 71, and McGregor, 46, on an April afternoon in Hollywood for an intense discussion of the choices they’ve made, the stereotypes they’ve avoided and the occupational hazard of uncertainty. Says McGregor, “We’ve been remembering lines for years, but the nerves, in my experience, get worse and worse.”

What are the parts you get approached for that make you say, “Not this again”?

RIZ AHMED (The Night Of, HBO) When you first start seeing gay characters in mainstream cultures or black characters or Muslim characters, they can start off as the stereotypical portrayal — it’s the cab driver, the shopkeeper, the drug dealer. And then sometimes, hopefully, you move beyond that, and it’s still storylines that are tied to that character’s ethnicity or their sexuality, but they’re working against those stereotypes. I was lucky that I came into the game just when we were moving from that stage one caricature into stage two. So a lot of my early work deals with the issues around the war on terror or Islamophobia, but I’m proud to say it deals with and engages those issues in creative ways and I hope in ways that move us forward rather than doubling down on lazy stereotypes. But yeah, there was a lot of, like, Terrorist No. 3 stuff — I just made a decision I wasn’t going to do it. I thought, “I’d rather be broke.”

Sterling, an L.A. Times column recently praised This Is Us for showcasing a black actor portraying “the simmering rage of the successful black man in white America.” What does that mean to you?

STERLING K. BROWN (This Is Us, NBC) What I love so much about the show and about the character of Randall is that he is black on purpose. So many times, for the sake of diversity on network TV, there’s going to be a black guy or a Latino guy, et cetera, and they just happen to be that. But the fact that he is black and we actually use that to tell the story of a black man being raised by this white family and still has the experience of being black in America … The feedback I get from people is, “We don’t get a chance to see this that often: a successful black man married with two children who is happy and succeeding but still has to deal with the fact that life is not the same, the paths that we walk are going to be different.” A white woman who had adopted two black sons was asking me the other day, “What types of things do I need to tell my sons?” And I said, “Well, when you’re horsing around and somebody gets singled out for being in trouble, when you’re a little black boy, it’s not just boys being boys, there’s an added level of scrutiny.”

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Official Trailer of Marshall

June 22, 2017

Open Road Films has released a trailer for Sterling’s new film Marshall.

Long before he sat on the United States Supreme Court or claimed victory in Brown v. Board of Education, Thurgood Marshall was a young rabble-rousing attorney for the NAACP. The new motion picture, MARSHALL, is the true story of his greatest challenge in those early days – a fight he fought alongside attorney Sam Friedman, a young lawyer with no experience in criminal law: the case of black chauffeur Joseph Spell, accused by his white employer, Eleanor Strubing, of sexual assault and attempted murder.

TVLine Podcast: Dream Emmy Nominee Sterling K. Brown Reflects on This Is Us Phenomenon, Teases Funnier Season 2

June 19, 2017

TV Line shared their podcast where they interviewed Sterling to discuss This Is Us, his fans, and the Emmys.

This Is Us MVP Sterling K. Brown would be the first to tell you that the last thing he ever expected was to be famous — never mind so famous that he’d end up being interviewed for The TVLine Podcast as one of our Dream Emmy nominees. “I always thought that I would just be working in obscurity in perpetuity,” he admits to Executive Editor Kimberly Roots. Like, “‘You’re that guy from that guest spot!’… or ‘I loved you on Supernatural!’”

Luckily, the Emmy winner (for American Crime Story: The People v. O.J. Simpson) sounds like he’s adjusted beautifully to his now-extremely-high profile. Take, for instance, his sweet reaction to being approached by fans of his hit NBC drama or his gratitude for the public service that the show provides by allowing a nation divided to, at least for an hour each week, “say, ‘It’s not us vs. them, this is us — we’re all in this together.’”

Listen to the interview here:

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